Bill Yates
Archaeologist/Historian
                                              
                                                                                             
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Cibola - The Seven Cities of Gold



Bill Yates and The Schliemann Group, LLC. are working on a project to excavate a WW2 Nazi sub we believe contains almost two hundred-tons of treasure.

On 31 March, 1945, with little more than a month until Germany surrendered unconditionally the submarine U-873 embarked on its first and only voyage. While officially the sub was listed as being on a war patrol oddities and inconsistencies would point otherwise. According to US Naval documents for example, nine months earlier U-873 underwent an extensive overhaul which allowed the desperately needed war ship to inexplicably carry cargo. 

During the overhaul the sub’s keel duct was also inexplicably loaded with 100-tons of mercury and optical glass valued at the time at about a quarter of a million US dollars. The oddity of this is compounded by the realization that the expensive cargo remained on board the sub for the next ten months.  

The most telling sign that U-873 was on more than an end of the war patrol however came four days after the sub surrendered. When on 15 May, 1945, the Chief of Naval Operations sent secret dispatch “151716”, stating the commander of U-873, was of “primal importance” as only he “could furnish the answers to certain questions”. 

The answers the Navy so desperately sought however were never obtained when in the early morning of 19 May, 1946, after an all-day “session” with a “Special Interrogator” of Op-16-Z Section of the Office of Naval Intelligence, the captain of U-873 was found bleeding and dying in his cell. 

After years of detective work and research we believe we have uncovered the answers the Navy so desperately sought. 

It is our contention U-873 was not on a war mission but instead one of finance. And, the Navy’s concern was based on the credible belief that U-873 was towing a Nazi “Wunderwaff” (wonder weapon) capable of firing a V2 rocket into the heart of an unsuspecting city. However, instead of a V2 rocket in order to finance fleeing high ranking Nazi officers and officials the modified sub was instead filled with: (valued in 1945, US dollars)

  $ 166,000,000.00 in Swiss Franc gold coins
  $ 299,000,000.00 in American Paper Currency and Gold Coins
  $ 31,000,000.00 in Gold bullion bars, (mostly Russian 70 kilo      ingots, with some Italian bars).  
  $ 3,000,000.00 in Gem quality Diamonds
  $ 93,000,000.00 in Objects de Art, (paintings, frescos, statuary    etc.)

There was a problem however as before they could complete their mission the war ended. 

Despite receiving orders on several occasions to return to a German base it is our assertion in an effort to hide the sub’s valuable contents in an area that they may later be retrieved, the captain of U-873 proceeded to a pre-determined point in the Caribbean and scuttled the Wunderwaff in about 200 feet of water. 

We believe we’ve located the treasure laden wonder weapon the captain of U-873 gave his life to protect. Our team of companies are finalizing plans to register and excavate the re-fitted sub. Visit theschgrp.com and decide for yourself if we’ve found one of the greatest treasure’s in history.  

Refitted Type VII U-boat